Two ways to see the outdoors

The New York Times and Sotheby’s, via a link on the Times website, offer up two ways to get outdoors:

1. Buy the $3,575,000 Snowmass, Colo., Lazy O Ranch:

(via sothebysrealty.com)

(via sothebysrealty.com)

Enjoy panoramic views from this dramatic, fully remodeled home on 3.56 acres overlooking the majestic 1,400 acres of Lazy O Ranch! Features include 6 bedrooms, 6 full baths, 2 half baths, 9307 square feet, spacious floor plan, top of the line finishes, striking log accents, ample master suite, wine room, theater, recreation room, air conditioning, two car garage, mature landscaping, pond/water feature and privacy. The ranch amenities include common horse pastures, barn, tennis courts, fishing ponds, hiking/riding trails and a manager on site 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Just 16 miles to the center of Aspen, and 6 miles to the quaint town of Basalt with specialty shops, restaurants, and renowned Gold Medal fishing in the Frying Pan River. Seller will consider a trade for a U.S. commercial income property of equal or greater value. Flexible and Creative Owner Financing Available. Originally $7,450,000 Now $3,575,000

(Hey, it’s reduced!)

2. Head out into our national parks and forests.

From Times columnist Nicholas Kristof:

During an August vacation with my family, I enjoyed lodgings so spectacular that not even Bill Gates or Warren Buffett could ever buy or rent them.

The scenery was some of America’s finest: snowcapped mountains, alpine lakes, babbling brooks. The cost? It was free.

We were enjoying some of America’s public lands, backpacking through our national patrimony. No billionaire can acquire these lands because they remain — even in a nation where economic disparities have soared — a rare democratic space. The only one who could pull rank on you at a camping spot is a grizzly bear.

One of the greatest things about heading into the outdoors is that it doesn’t cost a lot of money. Don’t get me wrong, you can spend a fortune outfitting yourself with all the latest gear and creature comforts, but you don’t need to do so in order to have a good time. Also, once you do have the gear your need — bargain basement or high end — the cost-per-day of being outdoors is not very high. Campgrounds are cheap. The miles you hike vs. the cost of food produces a nice return. Even a plane ticket, if planned out in advance, isn’t horrible when stacked up against vistas, rocks and waves. A bundle of wood may cost $5, but you get a couple of hours of enjoyment out of it while sitting around a fire. And, inexpensive beer and wine taste pretty good under the stars.

Think I’ll stick with the second option…

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One thought on “Two ways to see the outdoors

  1. I love Kristof’s description of the better option. And it supports my rule of thumb: the best camp sites are free. We have a lot of campgrounds in Washington, some of them charge up to $20 a night to sleep in, while all of the backpacking camps are of course free. These include a camp on Mount Baker where the ice cap fills the view through your tent door, Sahale Camp in North Cascades Nat’l Park where you drink water melting from the glacier, and many others.

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